Why ‘Somewhere in Time’ is a severely underrated period romance

It’s difficult for me to remember exactly when I first saw Somewhere in Time. Funnily enough, it was made the year after another time travel favorite of mine, Nicholas Meyer’s Time After Time. However, this one is very different. It’s an old school romance with an intriguing premise that you can’t help but get swept up in (or, at least, I can’t!).

If you’re unfamiliar, Somewhere in Time follows Richard Collier (Christopher Reeve), a playwright suffering from writer’s block. He decides to get out of town for a bit, visiting his old college town and staying at a historic hotel. He sees a photo of an actress, Elise McKenna (Jane Seymour) in the hotel’s hall of history and falls in love with the girl. Only one problem: she’s dead. His obsession turns dramatic. He talks to an old professor, asking if it’s possible to travel through time. He essentially tricks his mind into believing he is back in 1912 (Don’t think too hard about the time travel logistics. It makes no sense obvi). Once back in time, he begins his steamy affair with Elise, much to the dismay of her manager, William Fawcett Robinson (Christopher Plummer). Will it be Robinson who tears them apart or time?? You have to watch the movie to find out!

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I’m OBSESSED with the early 20th century fashion. I WANT A FAN!

Here are just a few reasons Somewhere in Time is SEVERELY underrated:

The Cast

Christopher Reeve was HOT (both physically and in the industry), having already starred in his most popular role of Superman! He turned down several movies around this time, looking for something specific. There’s something about his sincerity that makes this character and this film work. Is it the plot convoluted and nuts? Um, yes. But, for some reason, you look into Mr. Reeve’s eyes and you’re like, Okay, sure. He’s sweet and romantic and very swoon worthy!

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He’s a bit self-assured. I think the message is, time traveling gives you confidence…

Jane Seymour was in her late twenties at the time she made this and was (and still is) absolutely drop dead gorgeous! Seriously, though, she belongs on the cover of romance novels which is probably one reason why she got the part. Additionally, she has the acting chops to back it up – she is tough, but also naive and vulnerable and you fall in love with her (just as Richard does) instantly!

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In the early 20th century, taking your down = SEDUCTION. 

Christopher Plummer is also wonderful as Elise’s manager. He was, of course, known at the time for his role as Baron von Trapp in The Sound of Music. He’s deliciously wicked as the Mr. Robinson, but you sense that there’s more to him than that, a compliment to his nuanced performance!

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What is he really thinking? 

The Score, the score, the SCOREEE!

I’m sorry, did I say the score one too many times? Well, if you had heard even one minute of John Barry’s score, I think you’d probably be screaming too. It’s difficult for me to parcel out how much of my love for this film is related to the score. I believe it elevates every aspect of the film. Apparently, or at least according to the TCM article, Jane Seymour was the one responsible for getting John Barry on board. I can’t imagine this film without this music. They belong to one another. Seriously, just give it a listen:

The Story/Script

Alright, so I know it’s far fetched. And yes, I know it’s cheesy, but for some reason, it really does work. Trust me. Writer Richard Matheson, who wrote both the novel and the screenplay got the idea when he came across photos of a young actress from the early 20th century, Maude Adams. Her biggest claim to fame: she was the first actress to play Peter Pan.

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Quite beautiful, no?

What I love about Matheson’s time travel concept is that it’s all about the mind. It’s a form of hypnosis, not a machine. As a kid, I remember REALLY buying into it. I was like, Sure, you can time travel just by shoving everything modern into a closet and dressing in old timey clothes!

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As a child, this scene both scared me to death and intrigued me beyond belief.

The romance is that Romeo and Juliet, love-at-first-sight type of deal. But, again, somehow, through the performances, you buy it and you root for them!

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A BIT dramatic…but I LOVE IT! ❤ ❤ ❤

The Gorgeous Early 20th Century Costumes

For real, I think I am one of those girls seduced by costume dramas and the thing is, the costumes in this are so pretty, you can’t NOT be obsessed with them!

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So refined and gorgeous. THAT HAT THOUGH!

The beautiful cinematography!

There are many ways to illustrate that the time period has changed. What cinematographer Isidore Mankovsky did was use a sepia-toned filter for all the the 1912 scenes. Mind you, modern audiences apparently didn’t take too well to that. But, I think it was a wonderful choice, almost like being in a picture, in a dream!

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GORGEOUS!!

The Major Flaw: THE WATCH

Alright, so full disclosure, this film does have one major flaw. In the beginning of the film, Christopher Reeve is given a watch by old Elise in the 1970’s. He takes it with him back in time, and (spoiler alert!) leaves it there with Elise. So, the big question is, where does the watch start? Like, seriously, where the fuck did this pocketwatch come from? That seems to be one thing we’ll never know!

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This watch is magical I guess?

It’s a sweeping, underrated, moody period romance! 

Despite its convoluted premise, Somewhere in Time is a severely underrated gem. It was actually a flop when it was originally released and then found its cult audience through repeated cable viewings. Now, there’s actually an annual event at the Grand Hotel honoring the film and you can bet that’s on my list of things to do (once I become a millionaire of course! LOL).

Is it utterly ludicrous? Yes. But, I think that’s where its magic comes from. It epitomizes what I believe all storytelling should set out to do: capture the imagination.

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LOL this scene. 

Vintage trailer below:

Photos and gifs property of Universal Pictures.

 

Veronica Lake is my #WCW in ‘I Married A Witch’

Well, October is here and you all know what that means? Yes, that’s right. Halloween! I’ve never been super into the whole dressing up thing. I was Hermione up until 7th grade and then I just stopped. My parents didn’t want to buy me a new costume. So, I got very into Halloween movies. I should be clear; I’m not a huge horror movie fan. But, I love the fun Halloween classics – BeetleJuice, Halloweentown, Hocus Pocus, Poltergeist…that kind of stuff.

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Debbie Reynolds taught me: WITCHES ARE COOL.

If you’ve been following my movie musings, then you know that I’m also a huge screwball comedy fan. So, to kick off October, I thought I’d discuss one of my recent discoveries: Rene Clair’s I Married A Witch. I found it a few months ago when I raided my dad’s DVD collection and found a Criterion copy of the film. The cover intrigued me so I gave it a shot and let me tell you, it is a TREAT!

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Beautiful Artwork, AMIRIGHT?

Here’s a quick synopsis: I Married A Witch, made in 1942, follows Jennifer (Veronica Lake), a witch and her father Daniel (Cecil Kellaway), burned at the stake in the 1600’s and buried underneath a tree. Jennifer places a curse on the man who turned them in: all the generations to follow shall have unhappy marriages. Jennifer and Daniel are revived in the early 1940’s, just wisps of smoke before they find bodies to hop into. They decide to wreak more havoc by torturing Wallace Wooley (Fredric March) and making him fall in love with Jennifer. As always drama and LOTS OF COMEDY ensues!

Here are just a few reasons you should add I Married A Witch to your Halloween movie-binge!

The Cast

After I finished watching the movie, I called my dad and told him how much I loved the chemistry between March and Lake. My dad laughed, telling me, “Yeah, too bad they hated each other.” And indeed, they did hate each other…a LOT. According to Jeff Stafford of TCM, “…prior to meeting his co-star, Fredric March had reportedly said Lake was ‘a brainless little blonde sexpot, void of any acting ability,’ a comment that made its way back to her. In retaliation, Lake called March a ‘pompous poseur’ and their adversarial working relationship proceeded from there (Stafford, TCM Article).”The shoot was apparently very contentious and included Lake regularly pranking March and some very nasty shouting matches.

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In LOVE?

Lake was just coming off of her starring role in Sullivan’s Travels, another great screwball comedy. She has the very famous peek-a-boo haircut in this film and is charming beyond belief. Fredric March was a few years away from his most famous role in The Best Years of Our Lives. His befuddlement in this film is pure joy. He doesn’t know what’s going on half the time. Whatever their drama was IRL, it didn’t hurt the film. Their chemistry is palpable and IMHO, is what makes the film work.

In addition to its fabulous leads, the film also boasted great character actors such as Cecil Kellaway and Robert Benchley. Many of the supporting characters are Preston Sturges regulars and they add fun and whimsy to the film.

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Jennifer’s dad is seriously CRAY. #RealTalk

The Producer

Unofficially, Preston Sturges agreed to produce this film with Clair and you can definitely tell he had a hand in it. Like his greatest films, I Married A Witch is funny, farcical, and romantic. If you like this film, you should binge all the Sturges films – Christmas In July, The Lady Eve, The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek, Sullivan’s Travels…the list goes on. He’s wonderful.

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Shown: Screenwriter and director Preston Sturges, circa 1947

The Director

French director Rene Clair had only just made his first American film, The Flame of New Orleans, and it apparently hadn’t gone very well box-office wise. His agent sent a copy of a book called The Passionate Witch by Norman Matson and Thorne Smith. It was really because of Veronica Lake’s involvement that the film actually got made.

Clair’s name isn’t one that is remembered often enough. He was one of France’s first great comedy directors and his cache really became films that somehow mixed fantasy elements with humor and romance. AKA everything I LOVE. Some of his other great films to check out: Beauties of the Night, A Nous a Liberte and The Grand Maneuver.

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Rene in the 1920’s…NEED THAT CAMERA

The Script

This is my favorite era precisely because screwball comedies were in vogue. Though I know no one talks that fast IRL, I don’t care! It’s fun, witty, and FAST FAST FAST. Funnily though, this film had many cooks (writers) in the mix. Five writers are credited on IMDB for having some hand in the script. Rene Clair and Andre Rigaud apparently just helped in punching up the dialogue, which is ON POINT.

Even with all the cooks, the film turned out to be HILARIOUS.

Some of my favorite lines in this film:

“Ever hear of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire? That was our crowd.”

“Pistol, pistol, let there be/Murder in the first degree.”

Wallace Wooley: “I’m afraid you’ve got a hangover.” Daniel: “Don’t tell me what I’ve got! I invented the hangover. It was in 1892… B.C.”

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She looks sincerely in love, right?? #GoodActing

The Incredible Effects

One of my major problems with film today is that they over-indulge in special effects. I have no issue with trying to make a film’s fantastical elements come to life. But, many times, today, things look so perfect they actually look less real. While some might say these 1940’s effects are a bit hokey, I can’t help but be wowed by them.

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Just some wisps of smoke taking a broom ride…

The Cinematography

Going along with the effects is the beautiful black and white cinematography! Ted Tetzlaff was the cinematographer and with films like Notorious, My Man Godfrey and The Talk of The Town on his resume, I can’t say I’m surprised at the atmosphere and beauty. He was nominated for an Academy Award for his work on The Talk of The Town.

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Romance + Black and White = PERFECTION

Veronica Lake’s Dresses

Famous costume designer Edith Head was behind Lake’s gorgeous ensembles in this film and I want them ALL…👗

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That 40’s Style!

It’s a whimsical, charming, fun, fantastical comedy delight.

This movie is everything you want it to be. It’s funny, romantic, and beautiful. But most importantly, it’s FUN. At just 77 mins long, I Married A Witch takes you on a fast, crazy, ridiculous ride and lets you enjoy its fantastical premise. Veronica Lake didn’t have a great reputation in Hollywood, but as an actress, her appeal cannot be denied! And of course, the film inspired the very popular 60’s sitcom, Bewitched.

Drinking game idea: Drink every time Jennifer pouts. You’ll end up drinking A LOT.

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I wanna be a witch too!

Trailer below. And if you have Hulu, you can watch the full film RIGHT NOW. And if that’s the case, seriously, what are you waiting for? An engraved invitation? Go watch it NOW.

Halloweentown Gif is property of Disney.

I Married A Witch Gifs Property of Paramount Pictures.