The timeliness of Ida Lupino’s ‘Outrage’

Ida Lupino was a very special person. As you know if you read my blog, I only recently discovered Ida and in my last post I covered Ida’s acting, which was stupendous in its own right. However, she was a female director in a time when that was basically unheard of and the most incredible thing is that she didn’t just make fluff. Like one of her female predecessors, Lois Weber, Ida wanted to make films about social issues, things that mattered and she did.

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These old film cameras are everything!

I saw Outrage at the TCM Film Festival this year and was blown away by how modern it feels. Yes, there are certain period things that make you remember it’s an old movie, but the subject matter and how Lupino deals with it, are more topical than ever today.

Outrage follows Ann Walton (Mala Powers), a young woman recently engaged to a man she loves.

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Happy Ann 

Everything seems to be going well, except for one slightly annoying thing: a man who runs the food cart at her work verbally harasses her on an almost daily basis. Like most women, Ann deals with it because what else could she do?

However, one night, when walking to her car, that man goes from verbal harassment to rape, leaving Ann shameful and confused. The rest of the film finds Anne running from her shame, unable to come to terms with what’s happened to her.

Here are a few reasons you need to check out this film!

 

Ida Lupino, Ida Lupino, um did I mention Ida Lupino?

As a young woman trying to make it in this business, I bow down to the goddess that is Ida Lupino. I’m currently in the midst of reading a biography of her life and am so fascinated at the way she carried herself, despite the heartache and the struggle she endured.

She found her way into directing when the director of one of the film’s she was producing fell ill early into the shoot. Ida simply took over to save the film and the rest is history. She wanted to make films outside the studio system, what we would now call independent film. Thus, her films were filled with unknown actors.

Ida tackled difficult subject matter with patience and didn’t believe in traditional happy endings, one of the many things I love her movies for.

This tribute is a great introduction to Ida. 🙂

Mala Powers

This film hinged on whether or not you believed in Ann’s distress, her psychological trauma. Many dramatic moments in Outrage simply focus on Ann’s face. Mala Powers is exceptional in the role; she almost feels like a stand-in for Lupino had she acted the part. You feel Ida in Mala Power’s performance. And quite honestly, she moved me to tears.

She didn’t go on to many other projects of note, but continued to work well into her 70s.

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Literally bawling 😭

The Direction and Cinematography

I know I already said Ida Lupino, but for a film not shot in the studio system, with a very low budget, the direction and noir-esque shots are gorgeous and suspenseful.

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Terrifying!

Sadly, it’s just as relevant today as it was then. Even, more so. 

This movie doesn’t preach to its audience. It doesn’t tell women how to feel or how to cope or even that you ever really heal from an experience like this. However, I feel like one message the movie sends loud and clear is that victims of sexual assault should not feel shameful. They didn’t bring it on themselves by wearing too short a skirt or being too nice or leading someone on. The blame lies with the person who assaulted them and I think that for 1950, when no one was paying attention to this issue, that message is radical.

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Get ready to be emotional

Just in the past year, we’ve finally seen some strides being taken in society to not only discuss this issue but say clear and unequivocally that harassment is wrong and will no longer be tolerated. I’m an idealistic person and I’d like to believe things will change, but too often, movements fade and people forget the fervor that incited it.

Ida Lupino made this film seventy years ago, because even then, sexual harassment and assault was an unspoken thing many women had to deal with, often with shame and secrecy. I hope in another seventy years this status quo will not exist.

I was gonna link the trailer below, but the whole film is on youtube. You’re welcome. 🙂

If you watch the film and like it, drop me a comment or send me an email at thegirlwhoknewtoomuch46@gmail.com!

 

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Revelations about and because of James L. Brooks’ ‘Broadcast News’

First things first – so sorry I have been MIA over the last month! The movie watching has not stopped (if it had you know something would have to be SERIOUSLY wrong). I have been watching ’em and making my list of movies to discuss and over the next several weeks, I’m finally going to get to it!

Okay, now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, let’s talk about the brilliant, hilarious and extremely relevant film Broadcast News. This was a movie I had seen several years ago, as a young teenager. Although I remember liking the film a lot, this second viewing at this year’s TCM Classic Film Festival, was surprising. Some films just have to be seen as an older person to be appreciated and I think Broadcast News is definitely one of them.

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TBH…their conversation was straight-up hilarious. 

Prolific producer/writer/director James L. Brooks’ Broadcast News follows Jane Craig (Holly Hunter), a quickly rising tv news producer. She’s smart as a whip and literally thinks twelve steps ahead of everyone else around her. Her best friend is the hilarious, smart and IMHO very cute Aaron Altman (Albert Brooks). He’s one-hundred percent in love with Jane, something you can see five minutes into watching their relationship. A new anchor, Tom Grunick (William Hurt) comes onto the scene, pulling both at Jane’s heartstrings and encroaching on Aaron’s professional territory. In other words…DRAMA ENSUESSSSSSS.

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Burrrrrrrn. Really, though. I told you there’d be some drama. 

Here are just a few reasons Broadcast News is a movie you honestly should’ve put on your rundown (bad news pun)…like years ago!

The Cast

As I’ve said a bajillion times on this blog, casting is so important to how a movie turns out. If you cast people that are fun and relatable and just plain entertaining to watch, the characters can grow beyond just some lines of dialogue on a piece of paper. This film is a classic example of quite honestly, perfect casting.

One of the revelations from the TCM fest panel with James L. Brooks and Albert Brooks (no relation, guys, I swear) was that Holly Hunter was cast at the last minute and another unnamed actress almost got the part. Hunter was a virtual unknown at the time. She had just filmed Raising Arizona, a film which was only released a few months before Broadcast News. Hunter is the true anchor of the film, a confusing choice of words because she plays the executive producer of the news show in the film.

As a young woman, I find her portrayal of Jane to be so relatable. She’s so human and so complicated and filled with contradictions and you could never watch her and feel disconnected to her struggles.

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#RealTalk…I cry at least once a day.

Albert Brooks is so completely underrated. In the Q&A between Albert Brooks and James L. Brooks which was helmed by Ben Mankiewicz, Albert said he felt that Jane was never going to ultimately get with Aaron. Watching the film again, which was after the Q&A, I was like outrageously angry at Jane. If you were Jane, WHY WOULDN’T YOU GET WITH AARON? I mean, he’s intelligent, he’s funny, he’s self deprecating. He’s cute and a good person. I mean, come on, really though! I think this really goes to the heart of two arguments for me: one is attraction is about MORE than looks. The other is that I’m tired of movies never letting the actual good guy, the “underdog” get the girl. I mean, this is another Pretty in Pink scenario, guys. She belonged with Duckie, not that rich asshole.

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I flinch every time I watch this scene…

Whew, thanks for letting me get out, y’all. Back to Albert Brooks being awesome. He, separate from his character, is smart and literally hilarious. If you need some proof, just watch this clip from The Tonight Show back in the 70’s.

Now, I know what you’re thinking – I just wrote a literal lovefest about Albert Brooks. How am I possibly going to sing William Hurt’s praises too? Well, you’re about to find out. I do understand Jane’s attraction to Hurt’s Tom Grunick. Grunick is charming and obviously adorable. And, the thing is, Hurt is extremely intelligent so his portrayal of a dunce is actually quite funny. He’s also a fantastic actor who was already an Academy Award winner at the time they filmed Broadcast News.

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He’s a little freaked out…but his hair looks amazing!

The supporting players are also fantastic – Robert Prosky, a wonderful character actor plays the head of the news division. Jack Nicholson plays Bill Rorish, the top news anchor with an ego, quite a stretch for Nicholson! Cough, cough.

The real supporting MVP of the film though is one Joan Cusack. I’ve heard people refer to her as John Cusack’s sister which, is, of course, true but also infuriating. Do you think people refer to John Cusack as Joan Cusack’s brother? I think not! Okay, now I’m getting off topic. The upshot of it is she is a star in her own right and she is fantastic in this film. For real though, she delivers my favorite line in the film which she says to Holly Hunter’s Jane in tears: “Except for socially, you’re my role model.” Laugh-cry are the only words that can describe that moment.

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JOAN CUSACK IS EVERYTHING. 

The Script

Beyond the cast, the other essential piece of this film is the script. It is so wildly funny while also being relatable, relevant and moving. James L. Brooks wrote this as a romantic comedy which kind of cracks me up considering how the film ends.

Still, what movie being made today covers the same ground as Broadcast News? It’s essentially about people, but it’s also about the current (at the time obvi) state of television news, the ethics in telling a story, the moral obligation to be truthful. In this way, it’s an obvious precursor to Sorkin’s The Newsroom. His characters, too, are very preoccupied with the ethics of being a news reporter.

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Hmmm…I don’t know about that. #Rationalization

I especially liked the focus on the three main characters since they were all so different, but still human and likable.

Tom is the handsome idiot, except he isn’t. Tom has a skill set that both Aaron and Jane are missing. He knows how to present information in a trustworthy, confident way.

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Even his hair is trustworthy…lol

Jane is a career girl and I think the real reason she struggles socially is not because she’s incapable, but because she believes the only way to excel in her career is to block out everything else.

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Lesson learned: DO NOT MESS WITH HOLLY HUNTER

Aaron, on the other hand, is intensely smart but also neurotic, which is what ultimately is blocking him. He can’t stop thinking for a minute…which of course, I don’t relate to at all.

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The FUNNIEST scene in the movie, but it’s also a bit hard to watch. 

The Romance

As you all know from reading my movie musings, I’m a fan of the romance. Whether the romance is a fan of me is another story…lol. But, seriously, the romance in this film is wonderful because like some of my other all time favorites, this film covers mature romantic struggles.

With Aaron and Jane, we are presented with one of the most used stereotypes from romcoms: the best friend who’s in love with the main character. I think they both want to love each other in that way, but the timing gets in the way. Jane’s not ready to let someone in while Aaron is more than ready.

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That flinch THO. #RealityBites

 

And then Tom enters their lives and catches Jane’s attention. He’s attractive and confident and interested…and they do actually feel real things for each other. But, again, Jane lets her walls get in the way, because, timing-wise, she’s just not ready.

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He’s so TALL.

I think this is something not generally discussed in romantic films, the idea of not being ready for someone when they come into your life. There’s a reality there, so much so that when you see these three characters meet each other again at the end of the film, it doesn’t feel forced.

Because it’s still relevant, absolutely hilarious, and filled with brilliant dialogue and fantastic performances!

If you’ve never seen Broadcast News, you need to watch ASAP. If you have seen it, I guarantee it warrants another look, if only to realize just how much you relate to Holly Hunter’s character…or maybe that’s just me. I don’t think so…lol.

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Vintage trailer below:

Gifs property of Twentieth Century Fox.